Money

Money

Total Coupons

7

coupons

  • Advice from 1890: “How Some Women Earn Money”

    Posted on 07/02/2015 by | 0 comments

    I have no idea how I came across this browsing the Internet, but I did. And it’s great. An article from a 19th-century women’s magazine called “The Home-Maker” on ways to earn some extra dough.

    An excerpt: “[W]here women have given their attention to the buying and selling of real estate, they have proved themselves careful speculators. If women do not reason as well as men they seem to have intuition, or some other faculty, which serves them instead.”
    Yes, it’s old-fashioned in its language, but there’s also a delightfully independent spirit in the piece. It’s about women who take the bull by the horns and fend for themselves, rather than wait for someone else to come along and save them. Mary J. Ashton, the author, was no doubt a 19th-century rockstar.

    Here’s some more:

    Women are beginning to depend on themselves, and many are doing business, as a means of self-support. The women all over the country are asking and answering the question, What can we do best to earn money?

    One woman in a large city, who had a sick husband, resolved to do something to support her family. She leased a large block and rented out unfurnished rooms for more than the rent she paid for the whole block, collecting the dues herself, and had quite an income left. An old lady calling herself Grandma Patch, who lived near a young ladies’ school, did the darning, mending and repairing for the girls, and received a good compensation and was indispensable to them. A Mrs. W—, who had the gift of being a good cook, supplied a dozen families with warm rolls, in a village where there was no bakery, and others can do the same, even where there are bakeries, as most people prefer home-made cooking. Another woman makes a specialty of doughnuts and supplies a Woman’s Exchange.

    * * *

    In many of the town and cities of the West, American women who have some property in their own right, buy real estate as a business investment, and it is conceded by business-men that where women have given their attention to the buying and selling of real estate, they have proved themselves careful speculators. If women do not reason as well as men they seem to have intuition, or some other faculty, which serves them instead.

    In California many women own nurseries, fruit-farms, vegetable and flower-gardens. Three women in Kansas bought four hundred and eighty acres of railroad land, paying five dollars per acre. After farming successfully five years, they sold it for sixteen and two-third dollars per acre, and realized a profit of five thousand six hundred dollars.

    A few years ago four teachers formed themselves into a company and purchased one hundred acres of land near Fresno, California, for the purpose of raising fruit. Only two continued teaching, while the others superintended the hired men and assisted on the ranch, planting vines, picking, packing and shipping fruit. They now have a very large business, shipping quantities of fine raisins every year.

    One woman, whose kind husband died ten years ago, had been supported in comfort while he lived so that she did not have to think where the money would come from for the winter’s coal, or house-rent. She had not saved anything for a rainy day, and she found herself with four little girls to support. She was lady-like and had been taught to do well whatever she did. She went among her acquaintances and did fine ironing for many years. She excelled in some kinds of cooking, making coffee, preparing salads, oysters, bread for sandwiches, and cutting meats; therefore she soon had plenty of calls to not only assist, but to take charge of menus for tea parties, lunches and weddings; soon the different churches engaged her services to assist at their sociables to make coffee, etc., and cut the cake and superintend generally. In these ways she has been enabled to earn a good living. Another woman who was left a widow, was a first-class cake baker, and was in great demand for parties and weddings, as no one could excel her in baking or cutting cake.

    One young lady who was at a boarding-school and had a limited supply of “pin money” and wished to replenish her purse, had the moral courage to put a card on her door that read: “Shoe buttons sewed on at 10 cent a doz. Darning and repairing done neatly, at reasonable rates.” I need not say she had all she could fine time to do.

    * * *

    It is said that the last census gave the number as fifteen thousand women that made their living by canning fruit and vegetables.

    About two years ago a Miss Cassey of Oberlin, Ohio, got her uncle to make a plating machine to plate silver ware with. She says it cost nine dollars, and did the work well. At the time she wrote the letter she had worked twenty-two days and cleared $94.00. Her address at that time was Miss M. F. Cassey, Oberlin, Ohio. She offered to give full directions to any one for making and using the machine to plate gold or silver, that wuold send her specimens of stone, shells, old coins etc. for her collection.

    Miss Cassey just warms my heart. I hope her stone, shell, and old coin collections really took off after the publication of this article.

    Read more
  • UNPAID INTERNSHIPS

    Posted on 21/12/2014 by | 0 comments

    One of my favorite design bloggers — Bri of DesignLoveFest — recently posted a notice that she had an internship position available.

    Bri has her hands in a bunch of amazing projects. She’s the creative force behind Rue Magazine, she has a fabulous blog, and she does freelance design work. Seems like a budding designer or editorialist could benefit greatly from an internship with Bri.

    Problem is, the internship — 20 hours a week — is unpaid. And among other things, it requires “nitty gritty things like managing finances with accounting software, keeping up with correspondences with professional etiquette, and lots of research.” Some commenters pointed out that this may run afoul of the Department of Labor’s unpaid intern guidelines. Namely, the requirement that “the intern does not displace regular paid workers and that the employer ‘derives no immediate advantage’ from the intern’s activities — in other words, it’s largely a benevolent contribution to the intern.”

    A battle erupted in the comments, over whether it was appropriate to bring up the Department of Labor guidelines, whether the internship was actually violating the guidelines, and the value of unpaid internships in general (similar to the comments on a Design Sponge post about hiring interns). Many, many commenters wrote about how enormously helpful unpaid internships are in developing skillsets and — more importantly — gaining contacts in the field you want to enter.

    In college, I spent a summer with a popular women’s magazine in New York as an editorial intern. Although it was paid, we earned minimum wage, which doesn’t go very far in the Big Apple. I was glad that it was a paid internship, though, because it signaled to me that our time was valued. It was a true job. That said, I probably would have still taken the position if it were unpaid.

    Another thing to consider is that the nature of the paid v. unpaid debate may change based on whether college students, grad students, or non-students are the potential interns.

    Apart from what the law is (you can check out a NY Times article on the legal guidelines), what are your thoughts on unpaid internships in general? Do you think the benefits outweigh the lack of compensation, or do you think unpaid internships just give employers an excuse to avoid hiring paid employees?

    Read more
  • Why You Should Start Saving Money Now

    Posted on 04/12/2014 by | 0 comments

    If you’re in your mid-twenties, the idea of saving for retirement now may seem like a joke. You barely have two pennies to rub together after paying for rent, food, clothing, your iPhone bill, weekly pedicures, and Spot’s dog treats.

    But I’m here to tell you that you should find ways to cut expenses and redirect that money into investments. Now. Because there are some advantages to investing early that are really too good to pass up.

    1. The Younger You Are, the Riskier Investments You Can Make

    You might be thinking: “Riskier! How is that a good thing?” It’s good because as a general rule of thumb, the riskier the investment, the higher the potential return. Someone who is going to retire in five years probably shouldn’t invest in the rumored “next big thing” because if the investment turns sour, they’ll have to sell and lock in their losses because they need the money to live on. But if you’ve got decades until retirement, you can afford to bet on up-and-coming industries and take chances on your investments—because if it doesn’t pan out, you have time to recoup. And if that new stock does pan out—well, you could see a sky-high return on your investment that provides you with capital to invest even more broadly.

    2. You Can Make Money from Money from Money

    This is due to compound interest—and if you start investing young, you’ll have a longer to time to let compound interest work its magic. If you invest $1000 in an account that compounds monthly at a rate of 1%, then each month 1% of your investment will get added into the pot. After one month, you’ll have £1010 in your account. The next month, you’ll earn 1% of £1010, not £1000, so £10.10 will get added back in. Over time, this makes a big difference. If you invest £1000 now in an account earning 8% effective interest rate per year (an aggregate of the per month interest rate) compounded monthly, in 10 years it’ll be worth £2,219.64. If you added an additional £500 to that account each year during the 10 years, you’d have £9,842.39 at the end. The more money you put in early, the more you’ll make off of the interest that accrues—which is making money (compounded interest) off of money (interest) off of money (initial investment or principal).

    3. You’ll Give Yourself Freedom—Not Just for Retirement, but to Live Your Dreams

    It sounds really cheesy, but it’s true. Retirement doesn’t need to be your only goal when saving. You can also look at it as earning freedom. If you put away as much money as you can now and let it ripen into a nice pot of savings, you can take that money later in and do what you’ve always wanted to do. You can start your own company, hang a shingle as a lawyer in private practice, start an independent consulting business. The point is, you’ll have a nice cushion from saving early, which might give you the confidence and safety net you need to go it alone—to be your own boss.

    Watch for future posts on how to trim some of your expenditures, and what to do once you

    Read more
  • NEGOTIATING YOUR STARTING SALARY

    Posted on 30/10/2014 by | 0 comments

    I realize now that I could have negotiated to get, at the least, a small bump in pay. Going forward, I plan to negotiate. But how do you go about it?

    The Times has offered some good advice for those entertaining a job offer, on how to negotiate higher pay and better benefits, in five steps:

    1. Research salaries in your industry. This information will arm you with a justification for your salary request.

    2. Don’t propose the first number. Many job applications will ask you what your salary expectations are. Avoid this at all costs — it gives the employer the upper hand in negotiations. If possible, right N/A on your application. If pressed, give a salary range with about £10,000 between the numbers.

    3. Don’t lie about your current salary. It’s a risky move to get a boost in the negotiations. The employer could find out about the lie and retract your offer.

    4. Don’t take the first offer. A good rule of thumb is to ask for 10% more than the offer entails. Apparently, most employers expect this, and work the possibility of a counteroffer into their initial amount.

    5. Once you’ve got the salary down, go for benefits. This is a good opportunity for asking to work from home a day a week or a couple days a month.

    Have you negotiated your salary? What tips do you have?

    Read more
  • FIVE QUICK WAYS TO EARN EXTRA MONEY ONLINE

    Posted on 06/10/2014 by | 0 comments

    I’ve focused my efforts on compiling ways the 21st-century woman can earn some extra cash.

    And I actually managed to come up with a pretty decent list. These ideas aren’t going to earn you millions of pounds, but they are ways to bulk up next month’s paycheck.
    1. Freelance writing

    Chances are, you’re an expert in something. It doesn’t have to be rocket science; it may stem from a hobby—you could be an expert on thrift shops in Soho, or how to spot first-edition books by your favourite author. And even if you’re not an expert, you might have experiences that someone else wants to read about. You’d be shocked at all the things people are interested in reading about these days (or maybe not, the reality show craze teaches us that even the most mundane things can be entertainment). If you turn that knowledge or those experiences into articles or blog posts, voila—you’re a freelance writer. There are tons of websites that will connect you with publishers looking for content. Try Suite101—it’s one of the more legitimate sites.

    2. Sell your old stuff on Ebay

    I’ve actually been doing this one for years. Every so often, I do a closet cleanout. Most stuff gets donated, but I set aside higher value items with recognizable labels for Ebay. The key to making money on Ebay selling your clothes really is the label recognition, because there are people out there actively searching for those pieces. And that doesn’t just mean really expensive labels—stuff from Crew goes well because it’s getting a lot of hype and attention these days. Be sure to set an adequate charge for shipping and handling so that you don’t lose money on the fees. Sell a batch of clothes at once—you’ll find you use your time more efficiently when you photograph clothing and make listings at one time rather than doing it piecemeal.

    3. Answering surveys online

    There are some legitimate survey sites, and then there are many more illegitimate survey sites. I actually did some research to weed out the bad ones, and in the process found some doozies (I’d stay away from survey4profit.com). The good ones actually will offer you cash (generally £5 to £10 per survey) and gift card rewards (like from Amazon or Visa) for filling out surveys, which you can do while watching Keeping Up with the Kardashians (we all know that show doesn’t require 100% concentration). The two sites that I found consistently good reviews of are Opinion Outpost and Valued Opinions.

    4. Get in touch with your creative spark

    This will take a little more effort than the others, but you can create an Etsy shop in little or no time and start selling your home-made goods. Think photography prints, throw pillows, jewellery, knitted scarves  etc. Not into creating things? You can also set up a vintage shop on Etsy, selling thrift store and flea market finds (I often dream about doing this full time… what a life). Etsy also has amazing small business-focused forums that dole out advice suitable for any business-minded lady.

    5. Sell yourself for £5

    This is the most fun discovery I made when researching this post. Fiverr is a website where people post gigs that they’re either looking to fill or offering to do for £5. One gig a community member is offering reads: “I will write anything you’d like on my arm for 24 hours for £5.” Anyway, a lot of the posts are humorous and you have to wonder whether they’ll actually prompt a deal. But there are some serious folks looking for people to do tasks for them—like one fellow asking for someone to create a header graphic for his eBook, and another who would like to borrow someone’s voice for their travel podcast intro.

    Read more
  • Advice from 1890: “How Some Women Earn Money”

    Posted on 27/09/2014 by | 0 comments

    I have no idea how I came across this browsing the Internet, but I did. And it’s great. An article from a 19th-century women’s magazine called “The Home-Maker” on ways to earn some extra dough.

    An excerpt: “where women have given their attention to the buying and selling of real estate, they have proved themselves careful speculators. If women do not reason as well as men they seem to have intuition, or some other faculty, which serves them instead.”
    Yes, it’s old-fashioned in its language, but there’s also a delightfully independent spirit in the piece. It’s about women who take the bull by the horns and fend for themselves, rather than wait for someone else to come along and save them. Mary J. Ashton, the author, was no doubt a 19th-century rockstar.

    Here’s some more:

    Women are beginning to depend on themselves, and many are doing business, as a means of self-support. The women all over the country are asking and answering the question, What can we do best to earn money?

    One woman in a large city, who had a sick husband, resolved to do something to support her family. She leased a large block and rented out unfurnished rooms for more than the rent she paid for the whole block, collecting the dues herself, and had quite an income left. An old lady calling herself Grandma Patch, who lived near a young ladies’ school, did the darning, mending and repairing for the girls, and received a good compensation and was indispensable to them. A Mrs. W—, who had the gift of being a good cook, supplied a dozen families with warm rolls, in a village where there was no bakery, and others can do the same, even where there are bakeries, as most people prefer home-made cooking. Another woman makes a specialty of doughnuts and supplies a Woman’s Exchange.

    In many of the town and cities of the West, American women who have some property in their own right, buy real estate as a business investment, and it is conceded by business-men that where women have given their attention to the buying and selling of real estate, they have proved themselves careful speculators. If women do not reason as well as men they seem to have intuition, or some other faculty, which serves them instead.

    In California many women own nurseries, fruit-farms, vegetable and flower-gardens. Three women in Kansas bought four hundred and eighty acres of railroad land, paying five dollars per acre. After farming successfully five years, they sold it for sixteen and two-third dollars per acre, and realized a profit of five thousand six hundred dollars.

    A few years ago four teachers formed themselves into a company and purchased one hundred acres of land near Fresno, California, for the purpose of raising fruit. Only two continued teaching, while the others superintended the hired men and assisted on the ranch, planting vines, picking, packing and shipping fruit. They now have a very large business, shipping quantities of fine raisins every year.

    One woman, whose kind husband died ten years ago, had been supported in comfort while he lived so that she did not have to think where the money would come from for the winter’s coal, or house-rent. She had not saved anything for a rainy day, and she found herself with four little girls to support. She was lady-like and had been taught to do well whatever she did. She went among her acquaintances and did fine ironing for many years. She excelled in some kinds of cooking, making coffee, preparing salads, oysters, bread for sandwiches, and cutting meats; therefore she soon had plenty of calls to not only assist, but to take charge of menus for tea parties, lunches and weddings; soon the different churches engaged her services to assist at their sociables to make coffee, etc., and cut the cake and superintend generally. In these ways she has been enabled to earn a good living. Another woman who was left a widow, was a first-class cake baker, and was in great demand for parties and weddings, as no one could excel her in baking or cutting cake.

    One young lady who was at a boarding-school and had a limited supply of “pin money” and wished to replenish her purse, had the moral courage to put a card on her door that read: “Shoe buttons sewed on at 10 cent a doz. Darning and repairing done neatly, at reasonable rates.” I need not say she had all she could fine time to do.

    * * *

    It is said that the last census gave the number as fifteen thousand women that made their living by canning fruit and vegetables.

    Read more
  • ADVERTISING ON A SHOESTRING BUDGET

    Posted on 27/09/2014 by | 0 comments

    I’m sure many of you already know some little tricks of getting your business name out there, but just in case, I wanted to share how to get out there, internationally and locally on a very small budget.

    Jenny B:

    One of the best things I’ve done for myself on a local level is get magnetic signs for my car. It has my shop name and a little design on it. For two of the signs, it only cost me £25.00 and it’s wonderful when I’m at a petrol station — people will come up to me and chit chat about my business. That’s when you pull out your business cards and exchange info! I now have a lot more business locally this way than I ever had before. The best thing about the signs is that you can remove them and put them on whenever you’d like. I went on a road trip with friends of mine and advertised on their car through 7 counties! Just make sure you check with registration rules/insurance rules about having a business name on your car before you do so.
    I always make sure that every bar/restaurant/bookshop, etc., has my poster or business cards where they allow them. Especially if you make an eye catching/viewer friendly graphic. And at bookshops and the library I make sure I have business cards in the shape of bookmarks. It’s something people find functional and don’t mind carrying around with them slipped inside their books or magazines.
    Get involved and sign up for local business groups/farmers markets, etc. I’ve signed up for a “shop local, support local” group in my area and it’s brought lots of business and interest my way at no cost to me. It’s not only a great support system but it can really boost your moral in times of slow business.
    Get bumper stickers made or just regular stickers and leave those places where you would normally leave business cards, people love stickers….at any age! Also your friends probably wouldn’t mind slapping them on their cars as well.

    ADVERTISING THROUGH CUSTOMERS

    Obviously customers are your best bet to get your business name spoken about in a positive light. They are familiar with your work, they most likely love it and will talk about it. So make sure you send a few extra business cards with your orders, or in shopping bags in case they feel so inclined to carry them around or at least be able to recall your shop’s name and location.
    I also always try to send out a little gift for my customers to not only show my appreciation but also to help get my name out there even more. So I’ll send a bumper sticker, a small trinket for them to wear (with the shop name on it if possible), a bookmark, or a refrigerator magnet.

    THE INTERNET

    I’ve had great success advertising on Facebook and Google Adwords with a VERY small budget. You can set your own price and it’s a great way to keep track of where your customers are finding you and what they’re searching for to get to your shop. It’s also very easy to create the ads as well — literally just uploading a nice picture and your shop name, they do the rest of the work for you.
    Do your friends have blogs? Twitter accounts? Facebook accounts? Have them feature your shop or mention your items! It’s been great to network with other friends from etsy and help each other out because even though we all only know one another on a “world wide web” basis, we can still create a supportive community.
    Make sure you have a Facebook page, a Twitter account and a blog, even your own “.com.” I don’t update them each everyday but I try to do it at least once or twice a week, and they are free!

    If there’s one thing I do everyday multiple times a day, it’s RELIST, RELIST, RELIST. Just a few items, a few times a day can make a huge difference, even if it’s only every other day. I use my phone to do it if I am away from home, so if you have that ability use it! I’ll do it if I’m just waiting in line at a store, waiting for coffee to be made at the coffee shop, etc.

    Help out others in forums. Answer questions, give advice, critiques and share your knowledge with others around you. I find it’s a great way to discover new business’s that I’ve never seen and network with similar ones. I try to do that once a day either in the morning or night before bed.

    Have you heard of Google Analytics? An AMAZING site to use as a resource for finding out information about WHO your shop is reaching, and WHERE your shop is popping up online. Also be sure to do a social media search on sites like

    If you don’t have a featured items shop on your website make sure you keep a space on your page where you keep your viewers and customers informed, like a news section. Update it every few days and let them know what you are up to, like products that will be coming in soon or even mention other shops with products that would complement your own.

    I hope some of these suggestions have helped you or at least reminded you to keep the positivity going for your work and your shop. I go through very slow times in my store and very busy times but I always try to stay consistent with how I get myself out there. Even if I’ve had a slow week, I’ll still make sure I do ALL of the things I’ve listed above.

    Don’t loose the energy you’ve got for what you love to do.

    Read more